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Apprenticeship & Mentoring

Originally published in the Fall 2010 issue of the Home Matters Magazine

When I was a kid, I’d often get asked what I wanted to be when I grew up. My answer would change with the moon. I tended to favour the exciting jobs like a firefighter, policeman, pilot, and of course farmer. Being allergic to desks had narrowed career options slightly, but it still left plenty of thrilling possibilities. Then kid-hood faded, and reality took precedence. Having enjoyed helping dad on the farm, I decided to look for employment that complemented farming, upon completion of high school.

Originally published in the Summer 2009 issue of the Home Matters Magazine

As homeschoolers, our parents encouraged us to pursue as many opportunities as possible. We kept busy with chores and various projects. During our adolescence, we raised and marketed meat birds and chicken eggs. At the time, we didn’t enjoy all the work, but it established character and taught us the value of money. My brother Dalton and I would often work with Dad. We constructed numerous outbuildings for our animals and accomplished many home improvements. Together, we spent hundreds of hours working in the woodshop and fixing equipment in our garage. While we were growing up, my brother and I had a go-kart and snowmobiles. Although our father wasn’t overly mechanically inclined, he was very supportive of our endeavours and helped us gather the tools and knowledge to repair our unreliable machines.

Originally published in the Spring 2009 issue of the Home Matters Magazine

As a home-educated student in the 80’s and 90’s, it was never really in my mind to go the traditional route to college or university. Frankly, I didn’t think a post-secondary education was really necessary. I obviously have a different view on that now and understand the need for many occupations to have that kind of education, but I also see many young people that have more of an aptitude toward technical schools and the trades and I believe this can be an equally good option. I, for one, decided on apprenticeship through trade school. Here is some of the history that led me there:

Originally published in the Fall 2008 issue of the Home Matters Magazine

As a homeschooled graduate who entered the business sales world at age 17, there is no doubt in my mind of what was most influential in launching me at such a young age: the mentorship training of my father. During my final two years of high school – at ages 15 and 16 – my dad would take me into his office as an insurance agent. I would study my high school lessons in an empty office upstairs; then, in the afternoon, I would sit at a desk a few feet from his father’s desk, and I would help him on the phone with customer service and sales until dinner.

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